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Wednesday, July 27

  1. page home edited ... *R–K–10.1 Distinguishing between printed letters and words Materials & Preparation Pre-…
    ...
    *R–K–10.1 Distinguishing between printed letters and words
    Materials & Preparation
    Pre-activitiesMATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY
    Computers with Internet access
    Butcher or chart paper
    Cardstock
    Index cards
    PREPARATION
    1.
    Before beginning this lesson, copy the Alphabet Picture Pages. Color the pictures, cut them out, and laminate them.
    2.
    If your classroom does not have computers with Internet access, reserve three 30-minute blocks for your class in the computer lab, one during each session of the lesson. Bookmark the KiddoNet Alphabet, Poisson Rouge Alphabet, and Julia's Rainbow Corner websites on the computers students will be using.
    3.
    Print out and assemble a copy of My ABC Book for each student in your class. Each page is designed to be cut in half and then stapled together so that the final book is the size of a half sheet of 8.5 x 11 paper.
    4.
    Make letter cards by writing one letter on each index card. Use your students' skill level to help you decide whether to use upper- or lowercase or both on the cards.
    5.
    Assign students a partner for sharing. Consider the needs in your class and pair students accordingly.
    6.
    Make copies of the Letter Cards handout for students to take home. Preview the ABC Match game and decide if you want to ask students to play the game online at home with an adult or if you would rather print off the game cards for students to take home and play.
    7.
    Print out enough Uh-Oh! Cards so that you have a set for each group of three or four students in your class. Copy the cards onto cardstock, laminate them, cut them apart, and place in a paper bag or small container for Session 3.
    Pre-activities

    There is a simple warm up activity to get the students thinking about letters and their sounds.
    Begin by having the children sit in a large circle on the floor. (Children could be seated at tables.) The teacher should lead the children in singing their ABC’s.
    ...
    Begin with the letter “A” and have the student with that card come to the lined up cards on the floor. They should hold it up so all the children can see it. Then the teacher should ask “What letter is this?” The children will respond “A” (hopefully, if not tell them what letter it is). Then the teacher will ask the group “What sound does this letter make?” They should respond with the letter sound.
    After you have completed all the letters A-Z you are ready to begin the lesson
    Instructional Plans
    Estimated Time Three 60-minute sessions
    Session 1
    Note: Before students arrive at school, hide the letter cards you made (see Preparation, Step 4) around the room.
    1.
    Gather students in a group and build excitement by telling them they are going on a letter hunt. Explain that you have hidden 26 letter cards around the room and it is their job to find the cards and help you put them in order.
    2.
    Tell students that you will call on them three at a time to get up and search for one card. As soon as they find one letter card they are to bring it back to the group and have a seat. Then you will call on three more students to search for a letter card. Lay the cards out in the order that students bring them to you. After all the letters have been found, have students help you put them in alphabetical order on butcher or chart paper and glue or tape them down.
    3.
    After you have put all the letter cards in order, invite students to say the names of the letters and the sounds they make.
    4.
    Next, hand out the copies of My ABC Book to students. Tell them that they are going to be visiting different alphabet sites. Their job is to go on a letter hunt and find different words that begin with each letter.
    5.
    Before looking at the first website, model for students how to record in their ABC books. It may also be helpful to give them a goal for this session. Students will probably be excited about looking at the website and may forget to record some of the letters in their ABC books. A goal of at least five letters is reasonable.
    For special education students or students who don't know all of their letters, you may want to change the goal to three letters in their ABC book and only give them one page to work on at a time. When they complete a page, give them a new page to work on. It also may be helpful to have students start with the letters in their name since they will be more likely to know those.
    6.
    Show students how to use the KiddoNet Alphabet website. They should click on a letter and then click on the images they think start with that letter.
    7.
    Allow students to work independently, monitoring them while they are working. As they draw a picture in their books, ask them to tell you about their drawing. You might write the word below the picture. For students who are already writing, encourage them to write the word below the picture, listening especially to the beginning sound as they write. For kindergarten students, invented spelling is fine.
    Watch ELL students closely while they are working on the computer and check for understanding. You may also want to have them practice saying the letter and the picture name as they work.
    8.
    To end the session, have students share their books with the partners you have selected (see Preparation, Step 5). Tell students that if their partners drew a picture for a letter that they didn't get to, they can add that to their book. ELL students might like to choose a picture in their ABC book and teach the class how to say that word in their native language. However, check with them first before putting them on the spot.
    Home Connection: Send home the Letter Cards handout with each student. Parents or caregivers should play this game with students by drawing a letter out of the bag and saying the name, sound, or a word that begins with that letter. Then they can work together to put the alphabet in order. (Adults might eventually time students to see how quickly they can do this.)
    If necessary, give ELL students or students who may not have the opportunity to work with an adult after school time to play this game with an adult at school.
    session2Session 2
    1.
    Gather students and bring out the alphabet chart that they created during Session 1. Ask them if they can think of words that begin with any of these letters.
    2.
    Display the Alphabet Picture Pages cards for the letters in random order.
    3.
    Ask students to say the name of the picture and then identify the beginning letter. Draw attention to the sound they hear at the beginning of the word.
    4.
    Tape the picture below the corresponding letter on the alphabet chart.
    5.
    Have students get out their ABC books that they started during Session 1. Briefly walk students through their book reviewing all of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds. Choose a few students to share a picture from their ABC book.
    6.
    Tell students that they will be visiting a new alphabet website. Review directions for recording in their ABC books. Challenge students to work on letters that they have not done yet. As you did in Session 1, you may want to give students who do not know all of their letters only a few pages of the book to work on at a time.
    7.
    Show students how to use Julia's Rainbow Corner. When they click on a letter, they will hear the letter name and see a picture that begins with that letter. Model for students how to click the letter, listen to the letter name, say the word for the picture out loud, and record it in their ABC book.
    Pair students who do not know all of their letters with a student who does or with an adult volunteer. You may also want to do the same thing with ELL students; because this site does not say the name of the picture, they may not have the vocabulary to know the name for each item. A partner can say the name out loud in English.
    Some students may finish adding pictures to the books quickly. Challenge them to think of more words that go with each letter or ask them to write tongue twister sentences for each letter. You may have to give them an example to get them started.
    8.
    Have students share their new additions in the ABC book with their partners. As during Session 1, this is a chance for students to add new pictures to their own ABC book.
    Home Connection: Either send home instructions to play the ABC Match game online or the game cards. If the student is playing online, an adult should supervise and help the student decide whether to play against the timer or not. If the adult and student are playing with the cards, they should lay all the cards face down. They then should take turns turning over two cards, trying to find a letter and picture that match. The winner is the one with the most matches. For ELL students or students that may not have the opportunity to work with an adult after school, allow time for them to play the game with an adult at school.
    session3Session 3
    1.
    Put the Uh-Oh! Cards in a bag and have students sit in a circle. Students should take turns drawing one card at a time out of the bag. They can either say the letter name, the sound it makes, or a word that begins with that letter. Once they say the name, sound, or word, they get to keep the card. If they draw an Uh-Oh! Card, they have to put all of their letters back in the bag. Continue passing the bag around the circle until every student has had a few chances. Once the time is up, the person who has collected the most cards wins the game.
    2.
    Once you have modeled how the game is played with the entire class, have students get into groups of three or four to play. To help all students feel successful, tell the class that they can help each other out if someone seems stuck and asks for help.
    Closely monitor your ELL and struggling students to make sure that they are feeling successful. It may be helpful to pair them with an older student or an adult volunteer. If the game seems to be going smoothly for the rest of the class, you may want to gather a small group of struggling students to play the game with you if you feel that they would benefit from extra support.
    3.
    After playing Uh-Oh!, have students take out their ABC books. Ask them to look through their book and find the letters they still need pictures for. Direct them to begin with those letters when completing this session's Internet activity. Continue supporting students as you have during earlier sessions.
    4.
    Show students the Poisson Rouge Alphabet website. Demonstrate how to navigate the site. If you roll the mouse over each letter, a picture appears that begins with that letter. Encourage students to click on the letters and then the sentences that appear.
    5.
    After students have finished working on the computers, have them work with their partners to share their ABC book. Like before, students can add to their ABC book if they need to complete some pages.
    All students may not finish within the three sessions. Allow extra time in the classroom or meet with small groups of students to help them finish before sending their book home.
    Home Connection: Have students take their ABC book home to read to an adult. The very last page in the book is a comment page for parents to write a positive note about their child's ABC book. For ELL students or students that may not have the opportunity to work with an adult after school, allow time for them to share with an adult at school.
    extensionsEXTENSIONS
    Use the interactive Alphabet Organizer to have students create an alphabet book. This activity can be done with the whole class or in small groups. Have students choose either Option 1 (one word per letter) or Option 2 (more than one word per letter) and type in words that begin with each letter of the alphabet. Students can then print their letter pages, create illustrations, and collate them into a book. Have students share their books with the class.
    Give students fun practice with matching beginning-letter, long-vowel, and short-vowel sounds to images using the Picture Match game.
    If you have Spanish-speaking students in your class, teaching cognates is a fun way to include Spanish into letter learning. Make the pages ahead of time with the letter, the English word, and the Spanish word already on the page. Ask students to help you illustrate the book. Laminate and bind the book, and keep it in the classroom for read alouds.
    student-assessmentSTUDENT ASSESSMENT
    Keep a checklist of the letters and sounds students consistently recognize. Take note of each student’s level of participation during the group activities in the classroom. Reflect on each student's ability to identify the names and sounds of letters.
    Circulate while students navigate the alphabet games. Ask students about the objects they find and their beginning letters and sounds.
    Look through each student’s ABC book noting whether or not he or she was able to draw a picture of something that began with each letter. If possible, conference with students one on one and have them read their ABC book to you.
    As an additional assessment, duplicate student copies of the Alphabet Picture Pages. Instruct each student to color the pictures then write the beginning letter in the corner of each picture square.

    Web-based Interactives
    Students will create an Alphabet Power Point Presentation in this Lesson Plan http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/view
    Differentiated Activities
    *Interactive ABC match game-
    http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/abcmatch/

    *Students view Alphabet Band CD Interactive Book and review letters and letter sequence of the alphabet-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/alphabet-recognition-with-the-alphabet-band-and-express/view
    ...
    Resources/Extensions
    *Sing along with the Alphabet Band-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/alphabet-recognition-with-the-alphabet-band-and-express/viewhttp://www.oercommons.org/courses/alphabet-recognition-with-the-alphabet-band-and-express/vie**w**
    *Learn, Review and Reinforce Letters with this Chicka Chicka Boom Boom Lesson Plan-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/vi
    ...
    http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/3054
    Comments

    (view changes)
    6:49 pm

Tuesday, July 26

  1. 8:29 pm
  2. page home edited ... *Students view Alphabet Band CD Interactive Book and review letters and letter sequence of the…
    ...
    *Students view Alphabet Band CD Interactive Book and review letters and letter sequence of the alphabet-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/alphabet-recognition-with-the-alphabet-band-and-express/view
    ...
    alphabet book- http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Wikijunior:Animal_Alphabet
    http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Wikijunior:Animal_Alphabet

    *Movement activities that reinforce the letters of the alphabet-
    http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/3054
    ...
    http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/372
    *Identifying letters of the alphabet using the keyboard-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/viewhttp://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/2994
    *Letter Books-
    http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/3054

    Comments
    (view changes)
    8:10 pm
  3. 8:07 pm
  4. page home edited ... *Click to view a digital animal alphabet book- http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Wikijunior:Animal_…
    ...
    *Click to view a digital animal alphabet book- http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Wikijunior:Animal_Alphabet
    *Movement activities that reinforce the letters of the alphabet-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/viewhttp://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/3054
    Resources/Extensions
    *Sing along with the Alphabet Band-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/alphabet-recognition-with-the-alphabet-band-and-express/view
    ...
    Lesson Plan-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/vi
    *ABC Letter of the Week Lesson Plan-
    http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/372
    *Identifying letters of the alphabet using the keyboard-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/view
    (view changes)
    8:05 pm
  5. page home edited ... http://www.oercommons.org/courses/alphabet-recognition-with-the-alphabet-band-and-express/view…
    ...
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/alphabet-recognition-with-the-alphabet-band-and-express/view
    *Click to view a digital animal alphabet book- http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Wikijunior:Animal_Alphabet
    ...
    that reinforce the letters of
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/view
    Resources/Extensions
    *Sing along with the Alphabet Band-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/alphabet-recognition-with-the-alphabet-band-and-express/view
    Learn,*Learn, Review and
    ...
    Lesson Plan- http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/view
    ABC

    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/vi
    *ABC
    Letter of
    ...
    Lesson Plan-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/view
    Identifying

    http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/372
    *Identifying
    letters of
    ...
    the keyboard-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/view
    Comments
    (view changes)
    8:03 pm

Monday, July 25

  1. page home edited Kindergarten Letter Recognition Standards R–K–1 Applies word identification and decoding strate…
    Kindergarten Letter Recognition
    Standards
    R–K–1
    Applies word identification and decoding strategies (leading to automaticity)by …
    *R–K–1.5 Recognizing and naming all upper and lower case letters
    R–K–10
    Demonstrates understanding of concepts of print during shared or individual reading by…
    *R–K–10.1 Distinguishing between printed letters and words
    Materials & Preparation
    Pre-activities
    There is a simple warm up activity to get the students thinking about letters and their sounds.
    Begin by having the children sit in a large circle on the floor. (Children could be seated at tables.) The teacher should lead the children in singing their ABC’s.
    Next, the teacher will pass out one alphabet card to each child. Ask the children to look at both sides of their card and think about what letter it is and what sound it makes. The teacher will line up the extra alphabet cards on the floor in alphabetical order leaving space between missing cards (the ones the children have).
    Begin with the letter “A” and have the student with that card come to the lined up cards on the floor. They should hold it up so all the children can see it. Then the teacher should ask “What letter is this?” The children will respond “A” (hopefully, if not tell them what letter it is). Then the teacher will ask the group “What sound does this letter make?” They should respond with the letter sound.
    After you have completed all the letters A-Z you are ready to begin the lesson
    Instructional Plans
    Web-based Interactives
    Students will create an Alphabet Power Point Presentation in this Lesson Plan http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/view
    Differentiated Activities
    *Students view Alphabet Band CD Interactive Book and review letters and letter sequence of the alphabet-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/alphabet-recognition-with-the-alphabet-band-and-express/view
    *Click to view a digital animal alphabet book- http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Wikijunior:Animal_Alphabet
    *Movement activities that reinforce letters of the alphabet-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/view
    Resources/Extensions
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/alphabet-recognition-with-the-alphabet-band-and-express/view
    Learn, Review and Reinforce Letters with this Chicka Chicka Boom Boom Lesson Plan- http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/view
    ABC Letter of the Week Lesson Plan-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/view
    Identifying letters of the alphabet using the keyboard-
    http://www.oercommons.org/courses/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-learning-letters-and-sounds-at-a-zoom/view
    Comments

    (view changes)
    7:25 pm

Friday, August 13

Tuesday, June 22

  1. page Science Lesson 3 edited Karen Festa- Special Education Teacher Lesson: Temperature (two days) Grade level: Kindergarten …
    Karen Festa- Special Education Teacher
    Lesson: Temperature (two days)
    Grade level: Kindergarten
    What is the Temperature Outside?
    Introduction:
    Read Caps, Hats, Socks, and Mittens by Louis Borden. Discuss how we have been talking a lot about summer and how warm it is getting. Show students the outdoor thermometer and tell them that we will be keeping track of how warm it is with this thermometer. Describe how the thermometer tells us the temperature, whether it is hot or cold. Hang the thermometer outside and tell them that we will check it later to see the temperature.
    Goals:
    The science unit at the kindergarten level is an introduction to weather. The emphasis in kindergarten will be on observation and description of daily weather changes and patterns. How people are affected by the weather and the identification types of weather and the local weather patterns will be the main focus. The goal of this lesson is an introduction to what a thermometer is and what it does. We will also incorporate seasons, and graphing. More specifically, the students will be allowed to see how a range of temperatures fit into each of the seasons.
    Pre-Activities:
    Talk about what type of clothing you wear when it is hot and when it is cold. What does the weather look and feel like when it is hot or cold? What is a thermometer? Have you ever seen one? What does it measure?
    Lesson:
    Show them the teaching thermometer and talk about what the thermometer looks like when it is warm and when it is cold. Explain that they are going to make their own thermometer to practice reading a thermometer. Model the process for the class using the Scholastic thermometer template http://teacher.scholastic.com/LessonPlans/thermometer.pdf
    Send the students to the tables to start working on their own thermometers. When the students are finished, collect the thermometers and bring them back to the rug. Show them the thermometer that you hung outside and ask them what "color" it is today (what sticker does the red line touch?). Then record the temperature by putting that color sticker on the monthly “temperature graph” posted in the classroom.
    Red= 100-80 F Green= 59-50 F
    Orange= 79-70 F Purple= 49-40 F
    Yellow=69-60 F Blue= 39-0 F
    Add "Temperature Person" to your daily jobs and have a student check the temperature and put the colored sticker on the temperature graph. I would change the graph with each new month and hang the graphs around the room to show how to temperature has changed during the year. Hang the name of the month above each strip (January is mostly blue and green! But look at June! Now we are all orange and red!).
    Interactive Science Activity (Day 2):
    Sit the students at the rug and pass out their thermometers. Have them practice using them by asking them to show you what hot and cold look like. Then have them turn to a partner and practice with each other. Read Caps, Hats, Socks and Mittens by Louis Borden. As you read have the students show on their thermometers what kind of temperature you are describing.
    Extension:
    Encourage your students to look at the weather websites at home and watch the weather on the news. Ask them to color in a map of the world with the different temperatures to show their online research. Encourage them to visit the website www.weather.com or create a Google news alert for the temperature each day in a family member’s region.
    Modifications:
    For students who have difficulty reading the thermometer, use the same colored sticker code we are using for the classroom temperature graph and have the students put the sticker on their individual thermometer next to the numbers that pertain to the specific color. Place a “sunny” clip art picture where the thermometer is warm and a “snowy” clip art picture where the thermometer reads cold.
    Assessments:
    As your students are responding to the book with their thermometers, observe to see who is confident with the idea and who is not. If you do not think that you are getting a good idea from observation alone, you could have them do a simple project of illustrating a paper folded in half with a warm thermometer on one side and a cold thermometer on the other side.
    · Can the student identify the accurate temperature using their thermometer?
    · Is the student able to identify characteristics of a thermometer (red line, numbers and how they depict hot/cold)
    · Are the students able to accurately identify the appropriate temperature to represent “hot” and “cold”
    · Can the students tell which “color” to graph using a thermometer?

    (view changes)
    8:20 pm
  2. page Science Lesson 5 edited Karen Festa- Special Education Teacher Lesson: Studying Clouds Grade level: Kindergarten Clo…
    Karen Festa- Special Education Teacher
    Lesson: Studying Clouds
    Grade level: Kindergarten
    Clouds in the Sky
    Introduction:
    Look up into the sky on most days and you may see clouds. Clouds are made when air is cooled to a temperature where water in the air becomes visible or seen. This temperature is called the dew point. Dust is also needed to form clouds. The water condenses on the tiny specs; just like the mist in your bathroom condenses on your shower curtain or shower door. As you go higher in the atmosphere, the cooler the temperature gets. Sometimes clouds are formed because moist air is forced upward over mountains. Introduce the poem How Sweet to be a Cloud by A.A. Milne. While saying the
    poem, have a little cloud as a prop to move around while saying the poem.
    How Sweet to be a Cloud by A.A. Milne
    How sweet to be a Cloud
    Floating in the Blue!
    Every little cloud
    Always sings aloud!
    How sweet to be a Cloud
    Floating in the Blue!
    It makes him very proud
    To be a little cloud.
    Goals:
    The science unit at the kindergarten level is an introduction to weather. The emphasis in kindergarten will be on observation and description of daily weather changes and patterns. How people are affected by the weather and the identification types of weather and the local weather patterns will be the main focus. The goal of this lesson is to introduce types of clouds to the students and talk about how clouds affect weather patterns.
    Pre- Activities:
    Have the students gather at the circle rug. Talk about clouds. Have you ever looked up at the sky to see what shape or form the clouds look like? Have you ever seen a day where there are no clouds or the sky is grey with clouds? Why do you think that happens? If you were a cloud what kind of cloud would you be? Would you be big and puffy, or light and thin, or would you be dark and full of energy? Would you drop rain, hail, or snow? Get a few answers of the children who have their hands raised. Write down student responses.
    Say: We need clouds of all shapes and sizes. They give us the moisture we need.
    There are many different types of clouds. Did you know that? What types of clouds do you know?
    Lesson:
    Read The Cloud Book by Tommy De Paola. Make sure to show the pictures of the different types of clouds described at the end of the book. Ask to children to think about what type of cloud they would like. Write the word clouds on the chalkboard and pronounce it. Ask the students to share what they know about clouds. *Weather permitting; take the children outside to look at clouds. Discuss the different shapes the clouds seem to form. Have the children tell what the shapes look like to them.
    Art/Writing Extension:
    Read It Looked Like Spilt Milk by Charles Shaw. Give each student a blue sheet of construction paper folded in half. Have each student help you squirt some white paint into the crease of the paper. Fold the paper in half and smooth the paint underneath. Open the sheet of construction paper and have the student look at the “cloud” like formation they created. Have each student complete the writing prompt relating to their painted cloud creation “It looked like Spilt Milk, but it really was a _ cloud.”
    Photograph each student with his/her spilt milk cloud page. Add each photo to the classroom blog and record student’s dictations about their favorite types of cloud and why.
    Modifications:
    For students who have difficulty writing, copy their dictations onto a dry erase board and assist the students by copying their dictation onto paper. Model what each type of cloud looks like using cotton balls and real-life photos from http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&source=imghp&q=clouds&gbv=2&aq=f&aqi=g10&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=CGnkc-24hTProGaigzATU-LD5BQAAAKoEBU_Qc-Gn
    Assessments:
    Observe student behavior, verbal and written responses when talking about clouds.
    · Can the students define what a cloud is?
    · Can the students define what a cloud looks like and types of clouds?
    · Can the students identify how clouds affect weather?
    Rhode Island Earth Science Grade Level Expectations:
    ESS1 (K-4) POC –5
    Based on data collected from daily weather observations, describe weather changes or weather patterns.
    Grade Span Expectations (K-4)
    ESS1 (K-2) –5
    Students demonstrate an understanding of processes and change over time within earth systems by …
    5a observing, recording, and summarizing local weather data.
    5b observe how clouds are related to forms of precipitation (e.g., rain, sleet, snow).
    ESS1 (3-4) –5
    Students demonstrate an understanding of processes and change over time within earth systems by …
    5a observing, recording, comparing, and analyzing weather data to describe weather changes or weather patterns.
    5b describing water as it changes into vapor in the air and reappears as a liquid when it’s cooled.
    5c explaining how this cycle of water relates to weather and the formation of clouds.
    ESS 1 - The earth and earth materials as we know them today have developed over long periods of time, through continual change processes.

    (view changes)
    8:15 pm

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